Migliaccio di semolino (Semolina Cake)

Migliaccio, a crustless Neapolitan Semolina Cake, is a traditional sweet dish for Carnevale, may be less well known than the more iconic Neapolitan Carnival treats like those fried dough ribbons called chiacchiere or the lasagna di Carnevale so dear to the hearts of so many Italian-Americans, but it’s well worth discovering.

Called migliaccio because it was originally made with millet, migilo in Italian, most modern recipes call for a rather rich batter of semolina simmered in milk, then mixed with ricotta, eggs, sugar and flavorings. This recipe, taken from Jeanne Caròla Francesconi’s La Cucina Napoletana, doesn’t call for ricotta. And rather than milk, the semolina is simmered in water before being mixed with the sugar and eggs, with just a few drops of milk to round out the batter. Francesconi’s recipe is rather more austere than the typical migliaccio but, particularly if you like the taste of semolina, quite appealing nonetheless. If you’re feeling extravagant, it can be fancied up with candied fruits, raisins or chocolate bits.

It’s the kind of thing I can imagine Angelina enjoying, even if I don’t recall her making ever making it. Besides as a sweet snack or dessert for a holiday dinner, I quite like migliaccio at breakfast with my morning coffee.

Ingredients

Makes one 20cm/8 inch cake, enough for 4-6 or more, depending on appetites

To cook the semolina:

  • 200g (7 oz) semolina
  • 700ml (3 cups) water
  • A tiny pinch of salt

To complete the batter: 

  • 100g (3-1/2 oz) granulated sugar
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 2 egg whites
  • Zest of one lemon, grated
  • A few drops of vanilla extract
  • 100 ml (3-1/2 fl oz) milk

For baking and serving:

  • 1-2 Tbs butter to grease the springform pan
  • Powdered sugar

Optional:

  • Candied orange or citron
  • Raisins, soaked in rum
  • Dark chocolate bits

Directions

Bring the water, to which you’ve added a tiny pinch of salt, to a simmer. Slowly pour in the semolina, whisking all the time in a single direction, as if you were making polenta. Continue simmering over low heat for a few minutes, stirring often to prevent scorching.

Transfer the cooked semolina to a large mixing bowl and let it cool. Mix in the sugar, egg yolks and whites, lemon zest and vanilla extract, then thin out the batter a bit with the milk.

Grease a 20mm (8 inch) springform pan with the butter. Then pour in the batter, flattening out the top a bit with a spatula. Bake in a pre-heated 190C/375F oven for 60 minutes or so, until golden brown on top.

Remove the migliaccio from the oven and let it cool completely. Serve topped with powdered sugar.

Migliaccio (Semolina Pie)

Notes on Migliaccio

To make this dish you want semolina, often called “farina” here in the States: fairly coarsely milled durum wheat. The stuff you also use to make Roman Style Gnocchi. You do not want the finely ground durum wheat flour you would use to make pasta. This article ably describes the difference.

Apparently, the original migliaccio was made with millet and sugar mixed with pigs blood, making it a kind of baked version of sanguinaccio—a dish still made today, and one I’d love to feature on the blog if I can ever get my hands on the main ingredient. A more common modern recipe for migliaccio calls for simmering the semolina in a mixed of half milk, half water (or even all milk). In some recipes, you add butter as well. The cooked semolina is mixed with eggs, sugar, lemon zest and vanilla as in this recipe, but with the addition of ricotta cheese as well. Here is one such recipe, in Italian. The milk and ricotta make it a much richer dish, perhaps one that would appeal more to modern palates. I’ve found a few recipes calling for flavoring the batter with limoncello as well. Personally, Francesconi’s more humble recipe is sumptuous enough.

There are also savory versions of migliaccio, where the sugar is omitted (obviously!) and the cooked semolina (sometimes mixed with or replaced by polenta) is mixed with various bits of salami, pancetta or other cured pork and cheeses like scamorza or provolone, much in the style of a pizza rustica, but without the crust.

Migliaccio di semolino (Semolina Pie)

Migliaccio di semolino (Semolina Pie)

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Bring the water, to which you’ve added a tiny pinch of salt, to a simmer. Slowly pour in the semolina, whisking all the time in a single direction, as if you were making polenta. Continue simmering over low heat for a few minutes, stirring often to prevent scorching.
  2. Transfer the cooked semolina to a large mixing bowl and let it cool. Mix in the sugar, egg yolks and whites, lemon zest and vanilla extract, then thin out the batter a bit with the milk.
  3. Grease a 20mm (8 inch) springform pan with the butter. Then pour in the batter, flattening out the top a bit with a spatula. Bake in a pre-heated 190C/375F oven for 60 minutes or so, until golden brown on top.
  4. Remove the migliaccio from the oven and let it cool completely. Serve topped with powdered sugar.

0.1

http://memoriediangelina.com/2018/02/10/migliaccio-semolina-cake/

(c) Frank Fariello

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave




Source link

Post Author: Carmela

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *